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pro bono: Links for Lawyers

RESOURCES FOR LAWYERS

 

For lawyers seeking pro bono opportunities:

 

 


Selected professional conduct rules regarding pro bono (excerpts):

Massachusetts:   A lawyer should provide annually at least 25 hours of pro bono publico legal services for the benefit of persons of limited means. Supreme Judicial Court Rule 6.1 — Pro Bono Publico Service.

Connecticut:   A lawyer should render public interest legal service. A lawyer may discharge this responsibility by providing professional services at no fee or a reduced fee to persons of limited means or to public service or charitable groups or organizations, by service in activities for improving the law, the legal system or the legal profession, and by financial support for organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means. Rules of Professional Conduct.  Rule 6.1 — Pro Bono Publico Service.

Rhode Island:  A lawyer should render public interest legal service. A lawyer may discharge this responsibility by providing professional services at no fee or a reduced fee to persons of limited means or to public service or charitable groups or organizations, by service in activities for improving the law, the legal system or the legal profession, and by financial support for organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means. Rule 6.1 — Pro Bono Publico Service.

New York:  A lawyer has an obligation to render public interest and pro bono legal service.  A lawyer may fulfill this responsibility by providing professional services at no fee or at a reduced fee to individuals of limited financial means or to public service or charitable groups or organizations, or by participation in programs and organizations specifically designed to increase the availability of legal services.  In addition, lawyers or law firms are encouraged to supplement this responsibility through the financial and other support of organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means.  NYS Bar Association Lawyer’s Code of Professional Conduct,  EC 2-25.

Washington, D.C.:  A lawyer should participate in serving those persons, or groups of persons, who are unable to pay all or a portion of reasonable attorney's fees or who are otherwise unable to obtain counsel. A lawyer may discharge this responsibility by providing professional services at no fee, or at a substantially reduced fee, to persons and groups who are unable to afford or obtain counsel, or by active participation in the work of organizations that provide legal services to them. When personal representation is not feasible, a lawyer may discharge this responsibility by providing financial support for organizations that provide legal representation to those unable to obtain counsel. Rule 6.1 — Pro Bono Publico Service.

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